Nov. 7 – Meet RI Author Connie Ross Ciampanelli

Connie is a delightful person and her story is definitely worth reading. As a runner myself I find her words inspiring. See her at the ARIA expo too!

Martha Reynolds Writes

Ciampanelli Connie

Journey to 10K: Adventures of an Older Novice Runner
In 2012, I celebrated my 60th birthday by running a 5K for the first time in my life. Never an athlete, I followed the Josh Clark Couch to 5K® designed especially for beginners. Journeyto 10K:AdventuresofanOlderNoviceRunner, my first book, is the story of how I achieved my dream. Written as I went along, it illustrates the successes and failures, good and bad runs, and discouragement and elation that I experienced.

I wrote this book to encourage others who embark on similar journeys. With desire and determination, anyone in good health can succeed in achieving their running goals.

Now approaching 63, I’m currently halfway through training for a half marathon.

Connie lives in North Providence, Rhode Island. Married to Tony for thirty-nine years and the mother of two grown sons, she works in the Guidance…

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Nov. 6 – Meet RI Author Kenneth Vaughan

Another fine Rhode Island author to meet. I appreciate Kenneth Vaughan’s approach to writing. Short stories will always be my favorite form of fiction as a reader and writer. See what Kenneth has to iffer at the ARIA book expo.

Martha Reynolds Writes

Vaughan Kenneth

Everyone writes, just as everyone does art. The difference is that some of us don’t stop. Most people are storytellers at heart, and I’m no different than anyone else in that sense. Even during periods when I wasn’t writing fiction, I spent a lot of time playing and running role-playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons, Call of Cthulhu, and Champions. There’s a strong collaborative storytelling aspect to that form of gaming, and I was always drawn to that.

After many years of writing without success, I finally made some decisions about my goals and the process. The thing that led to creating publishable work in my case was switching from novels to short stories. I had two complete novels, some aborted attempts, and a screenplay, but the fiction wasn’t good enough to take to a publisher or an agent. I think the screenplay is adequate, but the novels are…

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The True Meaning of Motherhood

One more re-blog before the day is done. This one by my friend Jen Basile. Her words touch the mother in my heart, and put words to the ultimate expression of love. And the girl can write! Enjoy.

Chopping Potatoes

What is a mother anyway?

What does it truly mean to be a mother?

In its simplest form, I suppose a woman becomes one through the act of birthing – but even that isn’t completely accurate. There are other roads and other roles women play to become mother.

The act of caring. The act of doing. Laundering. Ferrying. Carrying. Remembering. Reminding. Feeding. Bathing. Nursing.

Yes, but littles don’t even notice when we do these things. Maybe if we don’t.

Is it the arts and crafts, then? The activities? The culturally enriching experiences?

Our tremendous aplomb at managing the tightrope of work and home life? Or the cutting-edge at-home preschool curriculum we’ve essentially created to validate our exit from the working world?

Motherhood, at its core, is this.

Jennifer Butler Basile Jennifer Butler Basile

The gentle, yet firm embrace of a mother’s arms around her child. The child, no matter the age, wrapped…

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Five Fascinating Facts about ‘Jabberwocky’

I know, two Interesting Literature posts in one week.

What can I say? This blog is just so much better than mine!

So beware jaws that bite and the claws the clutch – and if you’d like to recite, hereyago –

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought —
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe

Interesting Literature

Interesting facts about the classic nonsense poem, ‘Jabberwocky’

1. The poem ‘Jabberwocky’ gave us a number of new words which are now in pretty common use. The most famous of these is ‘chortle’, a kind of laugh that is a blend of a ‘chuckle’ and a ‘snort’. But the poem – which was written, of course, by Lewis Carroll – also gave us the word ‘galumph’ (to walk clumsily and noisily) and ‘slithy’, in the sense of ‘lithe and slimy’. ‘Jabberwocky’ may also have influenced our modern use of the word ‘mimsy’, though this remains difficult to determine (‘mimsy’ already existed with a similar meaning, though Carroll’s poem probably helped to popularise it).

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Meet Rhode Island Authors at the Scituate Arts Festival – Columbus Day Weekend

Come and visit at the Scituate Art Festival, Village Green - Route 116 in No. Scituate, RI this Columbus Day Weekend! The Association of Rhode Island Authors (ARIA) will have its own Authors Row where many local authors will be selling and signing. Books make great gifts and many of our authors will also be …

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