The Resident Reviews A Girl from the Hill- A Parent’s Hardship and Recovery

English: Dahlia 'Graceland'

English: Dahlia ‘Graceland’ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Resident, is a local Mystic, CT paper, and the first publication that reached out to me for an interview once A Girl From the Hill became available.

What follows is the interview, which is not electronically available yet.  You can check out there site, http://www.theresident.com/ as I’m hoping it will be out there soon.

The gentleman who interviewed m, Roger Zotti, did send me a hardcopy in the mail, which I received yesterday.  To say I was touched by his effort is an understatement.

A Parent’s Hardship and Recovery – by Roger Zotti

The best way to understand the power of Patricia L. Mitchell’s “A Girl from the Hill:  My Mother’s Journey from Italian Girl to American Woman” (Balboa Press) is to give you a taste.  Consider “The Old Crow,” perhaps the book’s most telling chapter, which is about the ‘very severe depression’ Patricia’s mother, Dahlia Lydia Fiore Testa, suffered.  It’s about Dahlia’s numerous fears, especially “the fear of anyone seeing how frightened she was.”

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West Virginia’s Little Italy Communities Courtesy of Jovina!

English: Festival Seal.

English: Festival Seal. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

West Virginia’s Little Italy Communities.

It’s been a while since I reposted anything from Jovina, mainly because I am a little behind in my reading and blogging these days.  I keep commenting to her about compiling all of her Little Italy material together into a book–she does such a magnificent job of describing the history, the culture and the food in these spots all across the USA.  I have never been disappointed, and you can just read the care and focus that go into each post.

If you’re like me, you have a hard time picturing Italian Americans South of New York and Philly.  I never knew the important role that Italian Americans played and continue to play in places like West Virginia.  So cool is all I can say.

Great job again Jovina! Hope everyone enjoys this post.  And follow her if you aren’t already!

Road Shows, Then and Now

 

A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well, I’m a little frustrated with my running , or non-running self today.   But at least my Saturday was pretty cool, and filled with accomplishment.

My dear friend Kim accompanied me on my promo rounds, yesterday.  Like two traveling salesmen ladies we made the rounds with our ice coffees in our cup holders and 70’s and 80’s music on the radio.

First stop, Davisville Free Library in North Kingstown, where I am scheduled to do my first ‘gig’ reading and signing books.  I am both looking forward to this and dreading it at the same time.  Looking forward because it’s what I’ve wanted to do almost my whole conscious life.  Dreading for the same reason.  It’s a lovely, bright little town library with pleasant supportive people, so if nothing else I’ll spend a June afternoon  with some nice people.

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Special Offer buy 4 get a 5th Free ends Friday May 3rd

25th Anniversary 4

Thank you all for the kind and generous response!  PayPal should be up and running tomorrow for those that would like to pre-order an autograph copy of A Girl From the Hill.  Or Email me at pattymitch66@gmail.com and I will provide instructions on how to make a payment by check.

Apparently Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Balboa Press are all offering the book now too, but you’ll save shipping costs and get an autograph copy if you buy through me.

The positive response from you all overwhelms me! Thank  you with all my heart.  My Mom is quite excited too by the way.  A nice dividend …

By the way, the folks will be celebrating their 67th anniversary on Monday May 6th.  The picture here is from their 25th Anniversary party in 1971.  My mother always loved her Gardenia’s.

Today my Dad had to go to the hospital.  He’s home safe and sound, but he fell early this morning trying to get out of bed.  My parents worked together to get him up, him crawling on the floor and my mother sitting in a bedroom chair to weigh it down so he could use it to climb up.  I wonder if in their wildest dreams in 1971 if they ever imagined they’d have to endure such struggles as they did today.  At least they work well together as a team – they have certainly had enough practice.  Love you both.

More Beautiful Writing from Ann Hood- the Girls

For those of you who didn’t catch Parade Magazine today … http://www.parade.com/news/views/guest/130303-ann-hood-remember-the-girls.htmlgirls

For those of you who know me, you know that Ann Hood has fueled my writing inspiration for the last twenty-five years.  She still does.  She is a best-selling author from Rhode Island, taught at RIC and URI, and I was fortunate enough to take not one but two classes with her as instructor.  She’s phenomenal, and that voice she writes with that seems so easy to read is not so easy to replicate.  Believe me, I’ve tried.Ann is also from Italian American roots, so it’s a pleasure to compare her family’s culture to mine, and those of my friends.  She has a new book that’s just been published, The Obituary Writer, that sounds like a thrilling ride, as her books always are.

Struffoli – Italian Christmas Candy to Me

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/struffoli-recipe/index.html

English: Struffoli made in the traditional way...

English: Struffoli made in the traditional way from Sorrento. Marble sized dough balls covered in honey, citrus peel and hundreds and thousands. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My mother didn’t have the recipe written down for this one, so I’ve attached Giada’s here. I trust her, and her method seems closest to my mother and Grandma Jennie Testa’s. My mother told me to just use Wande dough for this but there are so many specific steps that I wanted to make sure that I captured them correctly.Italians make all kinds of wonderful desserts at Christmas. The cookies alone are of such great variety that I think one could really do a whole cookbook of them.Stuffoli differs in that it’s not a cake or a cookie, but these awesome fried balls of dough  molded together with honey and taste like candy. My Grandma Testa used to make these and so did my Auntie Dot, and I looked forward to getting a chunk, and chewing into the gooey honey and smacking my lips like Winnie the Pooh as I ate. My mother said Grandma, and her mother too, would shape the struffoli in the shape of a wreath and bring them to friends and family as gifts. Auntie Dot continued her mother’s tradition and would often make one just for me.

Struffoli does take time and focus, neither of which I have much of this holiday season. But I vow to make it next year, and deliver a wreath or two of honey balls to my own friends and family. And one for me too.

Disney's adaptation of Stephen Slesinger, Inc....

Disney’s adaptation of Stephen Slesinger, Inc.’s Winnie-the-Pooh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)