Finding My Way through Nemo

Hope everyone in Nemo’s path is safe and warm. I just took Super Beagle Trudy out for a walk and while the snowfall allowed me to experience strong feelings of solitude, peace and serenity, it also temporarily blinded me when my hood slipped off my head for a moment.  Wiping my eyes with my snow-caked sleeve didn’t help much. Luckily we only had to duck one plow and I had my trusty flashlight.  But this storm, like so many others, just amazes me with its power over all us earthlings.

I know I haven’t been posting much lately, but I have been putting the final touches on A Girl From the Hill and just uploaded it to the publisher. I designed a cover and I’d love to get feedback. What do you think?  If you can’t open this let me know…

A Girl from the Hill Cover Sample

My mother and I still have to sit and select the pictures, but once that’s done we’ll be ready.

And thanks to my friend Barbara Carroll, who helped me figure out what village my mother is most likely from – San Giovanni Incarico.  I have a few more details to confirm, but it’s so exciting to figure out where she’s from, especially because she wasn’t sure herself.  Here is a picture of the village from their website- yes they have their own website.  http://www.comunesangiovanniincarico.fr.it/default.asp?pag=0

Breath-taking.  No Nemo there.  I am hoping I can visit this village as part of my “Italy at 50” Tour next summer, funding pending…

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A Girl from the Hill – Where it All Began

Holy Ghost – where both my parents and my grandparents got married

Once upon a time there was a skinny little olive-skinned girl with the big dark eyes and long, straight, chestnut hair. Dahlia Lydia Fiore was born in Burrillville, Rhode Island on the Fourth of July in 1924, the eighth of eight children – four boys, four girls. Her father Giovanni came to Providence, Rhode Island, from San Giovanni Incarico, a small Italian village near Naples. Giovanni Fiore farmed. In Italy Giovanni grew vegetables and flowers; roses and dahlias were his specialty. After settling in Providence, getting work farming, he sent for his fiancée, Maria Giovanna Mollo. They married August 3rd, 1903 at Holy Ghost Church on Federal Hill. Continue reading