I Shall Return

A few minutes after the finish line, and I'm still alive!!

A few minutes after the finish line, and I’m still alive!!

I know, I know.  I have not posted a darn thing of interest all month.  But things have been a little more hectic than usual between all the bases being covered.  But two great things to report

1 – I started seriously writing my next book, which will be YA/Middle Grade with a working title of ‘Don’t Call Me Poundcake.”  More details this weekend.  I am very ready to start this new writing adventure and can’t wait to share it with you all.

2 – I finished my first 5K Race this past July 3rd at Gillette Stadium in Foxboro Massachusetts, home of the New England Patriots, and now, me.  I almost croaked in the pounding 90 degree heat as we ran around the stadium, up every ramp and then down every ramp in the darn thing, but I made it, thanks to these 49-year-old legs and tons of support from all of my friends and family.  Here is a survival pick of Jeremy and me after the race.

Love to All and I will be catching up with my blog posting and reading this weekend.

The Resident Reviews A Girl from the Hill- A Parent’s Hardship and Recovery

English: Dahlia 'Graceland'

English: Dahlia ‘Graceland’ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Resident, is a local Mystic, CT paper, and the first publication that reached out to me for an interview once A Girl From the Hill became available.

What follows is the interview, which is not electronically available yet.  You can check out there site, http://www.theresident.com/ as I’m hoping it will be out there soon.

The gentleman who interviewed m, Roger Zotti, did send me a hardcopy in the mail, which I received yesterday.  To say I was touched by his effort is an understatement.

A Parent’s Hardship and Recovery – by Roger Zotti

The best way to understand the power of Patricia L. Mitchell’s “A Girl from the Hill:  My Mother’s Journey from Italian Girl to American Woman” (Balboa Press) is to give you a taste.  Consider “The Old Crow,” perhaps the book’s most telling chapter, which is about the ‘very severe depression’ Patricia’s mother, Dahlia Lydia Fiore Testa, suffered.  It’s about Dahlia’s numerous fears, especially “the fear of anyone seeing how frightened she was.”

Continue reading

I Got Me an Author Page on Amazon.com!

Check it out!  https://www.amazon.com/author/mitchellpatricia

Check it out please, that is.  Blame it on giddiness and nerves as I prepare for my very first reading and book signing this Saturday.  Sorry, another shameless plug.

Still working on the page, but wanted to share.  Feeling like such the a Social Media Mogul!

Dahlia2

West Virginia’s Little Italy Communities Courtesy of Jovina!

English: Festival Seal.

English: Festival Seal. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

West Virginia’s Little Italy Communities.

It’s been a while since I reposted anything from Jovina, mainly because I am a little behind in my reading and blogging these days.  I keep commenting to her about compiling all of her Little Italy material together into a book–she does such a magnificent job of describing the history, the culture and the food in these spots all across the USA.  I have never been disappointed, and you can just read the care and focus that go into each post.

If you’re like me, you have a hard time picturing Italian Americans South of New York and Philly.  I never knew the important role that Italian Americans played and continue to play in places like West Virginia.  So cool is all I can say.

Great job again Jovina! Hope everyone enjoys this post.  And follow her if you aren’t already!

There Ain’t No Warning Labels for Crazy

Warning labels

Warning labels (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Warning: Crazy.

I have been saying wow to myself a bit more than usual tonight. Wow for the man who rescued those poor women from a decade of torture, and then refused a reward.  Wow to the people out there who are actually criticizing him.

And when I read this post just now Warning: Crazy., about the labels that don’t come with the mentally ill, again, wow.  So beautifully written, I just wanted to cry for the author and her brother.  We all need to open our eyes a little wider because it mental illness can happen to anyone, to any degree, and none of it is funny for the persons suffering and the people who love them.  I’m sure I’ve done my share of ignorant snickering, so I will make every effort to open my eyes and remember to treat people the way I would like to be treated.  Some very cool guy said that a few thousand years ago and it’s still the strongest truth I know.

On to my next book – Fat School Graduate? or Drop Out?

Now that I am an established author (smirk), it’s time to look forward to my next book.  My initial intention was to write a YA book about childhood obesity and the struggle to fit in.  I think that book is still in me somewhere, but I have not felt ready for it lately.

I have always wanted to chronicle my life fighting obesity, and food addiction, but without a happy resolution to date, I’m not sure I can pull it off.   

I think it’s time to explore my struggles in more detail, but only with a real, non-fictional happy ending, a triumph over my daily struggle to fight the urge to clean my plate and get another, to empty that box of Oreo’s once a single sleeve is ripped opened.  

At the very least, writing about the daily pain, discipline, temptations and frustrations  may help me as I fight to cope in positive ways with something that has been with me since I can remember, with very few breaks.

I know so many people, especially women, who have gone through similar struggles.  And it’s not just feeling physically ‘yucky’ and unhealthy when your body isn’t right, it’s the lack of energy, the depression, the clothes that don’t fit right and display every flaw for the world to see.  The perpetual sweat and the feeling that everyone is looking at you differently.  I know from being thin, and being morbidly obese, and being several sizes in between, that not only do people treat you differently based on size and girth, but you treat yourself differently.  And my Italian American heritage, the abbondanza, doesn’t help a bit either.

English: a Oreo cookie broken in half with a s...

English: a Oreo cookie broken in half with a stack of Oreo cookies in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

I’m imagining this next work as not so much a how to as much as a how did I get here, and what, if any, answers are out there that can help others.  I want to create a positive book that you will want to read, want to use to understand yourself or someone you care about.  And it has to make us laugh, because without humor, what’s the point?

Would love to know what others think about this.

And no worries.  The Girl from the Hill is not dropping off my radar anytime soon.  The real Girl is actually pretty happy about the whole thing, if not a little overwhelmed.  A lot of people have pre-ordered and requested signed copies by her vs. me, which is wonderful.  I think we have to take our show on the road – the Summer of the Girl, here we come!